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What's on - January 2021

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  • 2 January 2021 - 28 February 2021Drama/Dance/Musicals

    Short Plays for Short Journeys

    Podcast subscribers who enjoy listening to drama now have access to a brand new drama series: Short Plays for Short Journeys.

    This new podcast, created by Wild Duck Productions of the award-winning Wild Duck Theatre, showcases talented but unheard playwrights. Season one consists of four diverse plays including Brothers, by Matthew Huntington, a witty family drama with a sequel in Season Two due out in early 2021.

    The podcasts have been launched as a way to share, on new platforms, the professional work of this company led by Creative Director Susan Conte.

    Each episode has a different storyline and style, exploring the nature of the human condition and each runs between eleven and nineteen minutes. Brothers, for example, delicately yet with great humour, explores the pain and shame of infertility.

    Conte, whose recent work for Wild Duck includes “Things I know to be True” and sell-out success “King Charles III” commented, “With so many exceptional writers, we searched for ways to bring to life the work of these authors and combine their creativity with our company of talented actors and directors. “

    Producer, Fleur de Henrie Pearce, continued, “During these uncertain times it’s a joy to bring some escapism to our patrons who are currently unable to attend stage productions.  Podcasts offer an immediate theatre experience and with the varied running times, the option to listen on the move or when you feel like escaping to another time is available to listeners.”

    Season one is now live on major podcast platforms and is available to listen to here www.wildducktheatre.com/podcasts

    Donations to support the podcast and new writing can be made at www.wildducktheatre.com/donate

    For fuller sponsorship partnership opportunities with Wild Duck Productions, please do get in touch info@wildducktheatre.london

    If you're a Writer, Director, or Actor looking to showcase and would like to be a part of future Seasons, we'd love to hear from you.

    We are also looking to collaborate with creative sound designers for Season 2 and

    beyond. For further information please go to www.wildducktheatre.com/who-are-we

    ---Notes to editors---

    Wild Duck Theatre is a London based theatre company established in 2015, with a mission to produce high quality contemporary work, combining the best talent - experienced amateur or polished professional and often a mixture of both. Writers, Actors and Directors often develop their career ambitions by showcasing with us.

    For more information please contact production@wildducktheatre.com or

    www.wildducktheatre.com

    Wild Duck Theatre event

  • 13 January 2021 - 30 January 2021Drama/Dance/Musicals

    Myths and Adventures from Ancient Greece, a series of four online children’s theatre shows written by Hannah Khalil

    Watermans is delighted to present Myths and Adventures from Ancient Greece, a series of four online children’s theatre shows written by Hannah Khalil (15 Heroines, Jermyn Street Theatre; Not The Gingerbread Man and Mrs Scrooge, Fly High Stories; and A Museum in Baghdad, RSC). Created for 3-8 year olds, Myths and Adventures from Ancient Greece will explore the tales of Persephone, Theseus and the Minotaur, King Midas and his Golden Touch and Pandora’s Box. The plays will be available to view online from 13 January 2021.

    Children will enter a miniature world full of exciting adventures, with the battered insect Hope as their guide. Hope journeys into the world of Ancient Greece to escape Pandora's Box, warn King Midas of his greed, seek Persephone in the Underworld and help Theseus to defeat the Minotaur. With charming designs from Sam Wilde (Fly High Stories, Hiccup Theatre Company), under the direction of Ian Nicholson (I Want My Hat Back, This is Not My Hat, I Found My Hat with Little Angel Theatre), this project offers an engaging and delightfully imaginative adventure to Ancient Greece. Ian Nicholson and Peyvand Sadeghian (Little Angel Theatre, Goblin Theatre) perform. Full details https://www.watermans.org.uk/ 

    Following successful forays into online events in live gigs and film talks, Watermans has turned its attentions to this commission for children because of its continued commitment to widening access to theatre among young people. It is also clear that many children simply won’t have that opportunity to visit the theatre over the coming months because of coronavirus restrictions and Watermans believes this poses a risk to developing future audiences. This commission helps to bridge that gap, bringing the joy of theatre into the home or classroom in theatre shows designed to be viewed online.

    Watermans chose the Greek Myths because of their enduring and timeless appeal and the way they address what it means to be human which can ignite interesting conversations with even the youngest children. The Greek Myths are also on the KS2 curriculum so this series is an additional resource for teachers who are looking to inspire their pupils.

    Watermans Art Centre event

  • 14 January 2021 - 30 January 2021Drama/Dance/Musicals

    Pandora | Myths and Adventures From Ancient Greece

    In this new series of tales from Ancient Greece, children will enter a miniature world full of exciting adventures, with the battered insect Hope as their guide. Hope journeys into the world of Ancient Greece to escape Pandora's Box, warn King Midas of his greed, seek Persephone in the Underworld and help Theseus to defeat the Minotaur. In this first tale, we discover why there is always Hope in the world. Written by Hannah Khalil Directed by Ian Nicholson Designed and Made by Sam Wilde, assisted by Alana Ashley Music by Jim Whitcher Performed by Peyvand Sadeghian Commissioned by and filmed at Watermans, West London’s arts centre.Youtubelink

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jy8pFVqmZYQ&feature=youtu.be

    Watermans Art Centre event

  • 16 January 2021 - 31 January 2021Drama/Dance/Musicals

    The Crow’s Tale

    Due to popular demand, The Puppet Barge will be doing additional online shows this January 

    The Crow's Tale' by String Theatre

     

    Another chance to catch this wintery treat, and help pass those cold January lockdown afternoons!

    The Crow’s Tale tells the story of a Crow with colourful rainbow feathers that flies to the sun to save the world from an endless winter. Inspired by a Lenni Lenape Native American legend, and based on the picture book (of the same name) by Naomi Howarth, Crow embarks on a journey that will transform his appearance forever. Kindness, generosity and courage shine through in this seasonal snowy tale, retold using string marionettes. With a soundtrack of achingly beautiful original music, and accompanied by Howarth’s original text, The Crow’s Tale is a piece of moving and heartwarming puppetry guaranteed to delight adults and children alike.

    “It was hard to know whether to be amazed by the technical virtuosity of the two puppeteers, impressed by the beautifully crafted puppets, or wowed by the stunning stagecraft. In the end, I was simply swept away by an enchanting story, lovingly told..” 

    The Corn Hall Theatre, Diss Recommended for age 5+
     

    Puppet Theatre Barge event

  • 19 January 2021Literature/Talks/Walks

    Why Women Read Fiction: The Stories of Our Lives

    Professor Helen Taylor

    Why Women Read Fiction: The Stories of Our Lives

    Professor Helen Taylor says she always warms to men who read novels. ‘I love that they’re not reading to get facts…I think they’re reading fiction to try and understand the world from an oblique perspective.  Fiction takes you on indirect routes to truth.’ But sadly the idea that fiction is a purely female domain is taken for granted by most people involved in the world of books.

    So why is it that far more women than men are readers of fiction, literary festival-goers, members of literary societies and book clubs? This is the question that Helen Taylor explores in her engaging study:  Why Women Read Fiction – The Stories of Our Lives.  

    Come and listen to Helen discuss how women readers are preceived to form the life-support system for writers and publishers of fiction and why Ian McEwan once remarked ‘when women stop reading, the novel will be dead’. 

    Unfortunately, due to tier 4 regulations, we are no longer able to host this event live in the church. However, we will be filming Professor Taylor's talk and the film will be made available to BLS members from 19 January. 

    To join the BLS please email join@barnesliterarysociety.org.uk

     

    Barnes Literary Society event

  • 19 January 2021Music/Gigs

    Shakespeare on the Operatic Stage  Joanna Songi, soprano 

    Shakespeare on the Operatic Stage 

    Shakespeare’s plays have provided the creative stimulus for operas by countless composers from Purcell through to Brett Dean. They have inspired ground-breaking works by Verdi, Britten, Rossini, Gounod, Berlioz, Bernstein and Adès.   

    But taking Shakespeare onto the operatic stage is a risky business! Joanna looks at the challenges of bringing these well-loved plays into the operatic format and discusses their enduring popularity as an operatic inspiration. In addition to hearing excerpts from some of these well-loved operas, you will also hear other lesser-known works by Vaughan Williams and Holst. 

    Join us to enjoy the incredibly diverse music which Shakespeare’s genius has inspired.

    Available from 10.30 am on 19th January 2021 and thereafter in return for a donation. Visit www.operaprelude.org for more details.

    The Opera Prelude event

  • 20 January 2021Literature/Talks/Walks

    Gut Bacteria

    by Prof Lindsay Hall, University of Munich.

    Zoom meeting. Members will automatically receive a link to this, but others can email  richmond.science.society@gmail.com for a free link.

    Lectures are about 1 hour long, with opportunities for questions.

    Richmond Scientific Society event

  • 21 January 2021Visual Arts/Film

    The Underwater Realm with My Camera

    Discover the weird and the wonderful with Martyn Guess in his talk to Richmond & Twickenham Photographic Society as he demonstrates his passion to record vivid images of the world we live in both under the sea and above on land.  Check out some of his fabulous images at www.martynguessphotography.com/home.html

    Richmond & Twickenham Photographic Society event

  • 22 January 2021Visual Arts/Film

    This Week’s Recommendation: The Fencer

    The Fencer

    Estonia/Finland 2015

    98 mins, language Estonian, Russian

    Directed by Klaus Haro

    The Fencer was 792nd film screened by RFS on 15th November 2016. It was one of the four equal top ranked films of Season 56, with an approval rating of 95% from those attending.

    In 1953, a man fleeing from the Soviet authorities who just happens to be a champion fencer (incognito) takes up the post of PE teacher in a remote rural poor village school and, despite hostility from the principal, teaches the children to fence sufficiently well  to lead a team to victory in a fencing competition in Leningrad. As a wanted man, he goes to Russia at a considerable personal risk having been drafted into the Estonian contingent of the Nazi army.

    The script is based on the life of Endels Nelis, who died in 1993, but the film’s plot takes liberties with his story, in that there is no evidence he was wanted by the KGB even though Estonians paid dearly for being dragooned into Hitler’s killing machine.

    Short-listed for the 2016 Academy award for the Best Foreign Language Film, The Fencer is in many ways an old fashioned film: elegiac in its delivery, a predictable romance, haunting music to heighten the dramatic effect, long shots of landscape, quiet and understated -  to quote The Times ‘a pleasure to watch‘.

    Full film notes available in the Twickenham & Richmond Tribune - http://twickenhamtribune.com

    Regrettably, the film does not currently appear on any streaming services, although discs are available from Amazon and other retailers.

     

     

     

     

    Richmond Film Society event

  • 26 January 2021 - 30 January 2021Drama/Dance/Musicals

    Stones In His Pockets

    Subject to Government restrictions changing, TTC will restage Stones in His Pockets in Hampton Hill Theatre’s auditorium in a Covid-secure environment.

    This wonderful two hander, written by Marie Jones, will be performed again by Ian Kinane and Brendan Leddy, who not only play the lead roles Jake and Charlie, but 13 more characters between them.

    When Charlie, from Co. Antrim, and Jake, from Co. Kerry, meet as extras on a Hollywood film shoot in Ireland they strike up an unusual friendship. As the days tick by and their pay adds up they learn more about themselves, their local community and the people who have arrived in it than either would have imagined.

    The box office will open early January. Please keep an eye on our website and social media for the live date. www.teddingtontheatreclub.org.uk

     

    Teddington Theatre Club event

  • 26 January 2021 - 26 January 2021Music/Gigs

    Opera Live At Home with Cliff Zammit Stevens

    Cliff's recent performances include concerts and operas around Europe, notably Don Curzio and Don Basilio in Le nozze di Figaro with Garsington Opera on tour in Corfu, and Tebaldo in I Capuleti e i Montecchi across the UK and Otello in Rossini’s Otello. He was top of the bill for the concert in Berlin to celebrate Malta's EU presidency.

    Recent reviews describe his singing as ‘a revelation’ (Daily Express), and as ‘showing exceptional promise’ (Opera Magazine). 

    Arias this evening include:

    • Dies Bildnis ist bezaubernd schön, (Tamino) Die Zauberflöte, K.620/Act 1, Mozart
    • Una furtiva Lagrima, (Nemorino) L'Elisir d'Amore, Donizetti
    • Kuda Kuda vi udalilis, (Lensky), Act 2, scene 2, Eugene Onegin, Tchaikovsky
    • Ah la Paterna Mano, (Macduff), Act 4, scene 1, Macbeth, Giuseppe Verdi
    • No puede ser, (Leandro), Act 2, La tabernera del puerto, Pablo Sorozábal 
    • Granada by Lara Augustín

    Cliff has also recently founded 'The Marcy Foundation’ in memory of his late mother, to raise awareness of and to tackle social issues including domestic violence, mental health, child abuse, drug and substance abuse, and HIV.

    Accompanied on piano by Maria Elena Farrugia, a graduate of the Royal Northern College of Music.

    Programmes with translations will be sent out before the concert.

    www.operaliveathome.co.uk

    Helen Astrid Singing Academy event

  • 27 January 2021Literature/Talks/Walks

    Thames Luminaries: Within the garden walls at Hogarth’s House

    The Thames brought commerce and wealth to South West London, attracting royalty, aristocrats, artists, writers and wealthy property owners. The legacy of these luminaries is an area exceptionally rich in heritage buildings, gardens and landscapes. Pope’s Grotto Preservation Trust and English Heritage’s Marble Hill have organised a series of nine free virtual talks over three weeks beginning on Wednesday 27th January.  Experts will explore, explain and offer insight about a luminary and their landscape, property and land.

    William and Jane Hogarth took on a second home in the country in 1749. The house stood in the corner of a mixed orchard which had been enclosed within a high brick wall in the 1670s. Research into the history of the site has supported the lottery-funded Mulberry Garden Project now nearing completion. The plot has become an innovative "exhibition garden" with planting and features telling its whole story, to be recounted in this talk.

    The talk will be given by Val Bott, Chairman of the William Hogarth Trust (WHT). She has been working on The Mulberry Garden Project on behalf of WHT, in partnership with the Hogarth House Trust / Hounslow Council.

    Admission to the talk is free but but we encourage you to make a £5 donation for each talk, if you are able, which will be divided equally between the nine participating organisations. More about the talk and the speaker can be found here and you can book your place at TicketSource.

    The talk will start at 7 pm and last for approximately 20 minutes with time being allowed for questions and answers at the end. The event will end at or before 8 pm. It will be delivered using Zoom so you will need a computer or tablet with the Zoom program/app on it. You will be sent a link by email shortly before the lecture begins and you should follow this link at the appropriate time to join the audience. If you haven't used Zoom before, you will be prompted to download the appropriate software as soon as you try to join.

    This event is supported by the National Lottery Heritage Fund.

    (1898 lithograph of the gate in the garden.)

    Pope's Grotto Preservation Trust event

  • 27 January 2021 - 12 February 2021Museum/Heritage

    Thames Luminaries

    Drawing on the success of our Twickenham Luminaries lecture series, Pope’s Grotto Preservation Trust and English Heritage’s Marble Hill, with other local heritage organisations, have organised a series of nine free virtual talks over three weeks beginning on Wednesday 27th January.  Acknowledged experts will explore, explain and offer insight about a luminary and their garden, landscape and their property. There will be talks about the occupants and aspects of the gardens and landscapes of Ham House, Boston Manor, Orleans House, Popes Grotto, Chiswick House, Marble Hill, Hogarth’s House, Strawberry Hill and Turner’s House.

    Each 20 minute talk will be delivered using Zoom and will begin at 7 p.m. They will be chaired by Professor Judith Hawley of the Department of English 17th and 18th Century Literature and Culture at Royal Holloway, University of London. Time will be allowed for questions and answers at the end. The events will end at or before 8 pm. Attendees will be sent a Zoom link by email about an hour before each talk begins.

    Tickets are free but we encourage you to make a £5 donation for each talk, if you are able, which will be divided equally between the nine participating organisations.  For more information and to book your place visit

    Turner's House Trust event

  • 28 January 2021 - 28 October 2021Literature/Talks/Walks

    Thames Luminaries: A painter’s garden: J.M.W. Turner and the grounds of Sandycombe Lodge

    The Thames brought commerce and wealth to South West London, attracting royalty, aristocrats, artists, writers and wealthy property owners. The legacy of these luminaries is an area exceptionally rich in heritage buildings, gardens and landscapes. Pope’s Grotto Preservation Trust and English Heritage’s Marble Hill have organised a series of nine free virtual talks over three weeks beginning on Wednesday 27th January.  Experts will explore, explain and offer insight about a luminary and their landscape, property and land.

    In 1807 J.M.W. Turner acquired two plots of land in Sand Pit Close on the Twickenham side of the Thames, a short walk from Richmond Bridge where he built his little villa to his own designs. The house and large garden, with a large pond, stood alone on the fringes of two grand estates, and provided a peaceful retreat from the busy hum of the London art world..

    The talk will be given by Catherine Parry-Wingfield who is an art historian. She was a trustee of Turner’s House Trust from its inception in 2005, and chair from 2013 to 2019. She has produced two booklets, J.M.W. Turner, R.A. – the artist and his house at Twickenham and J.M.W. Turner and the ‘Matchless Vale of Thames’.

    Admission to this talk is free but but we encourage you to make a £5 donation for each talk, if you are able, which will be divided equally between the nine participating organisations. More about the talk and the speaker can be found here and you can book your place at TicketSource.

    The talk will start at 7 pm and last for approximately 20 minutes with time being allowed for questions and answers at the end. The event will end at or before 8 pm. It will be delivered using Zoom so you will need a computer or tablet with the Zoom program/app on it. You will be sent a link by email shortly before the lecture begins and you should follow this link at the appropriate time to join the audience. If you haven't used Zoom before, you will be prompted to download the appropriate software as soon as you try to join. 

    This event is supported by the National Lottery Heritage Fund.

    (Sandycombe Lodge by W. Havell, c. 1814 pencil and brown wash)

    Pope's Grotto Preservation Trust event

  • 29 January 2021Literature/Talks/Walks

    Thames Luminaries: Alexander Pope: the poet and the poetic landscape

    The Thames brought commerce and wealth to South West London, attracting royalty, aristocrats, artists, writers and wealthy property owners. The legacy of these luminaries is an area exceptionally rich in heritage buildings, gardens and landscapes. Pope’s Grotto Preservation Trust and English Heritage’s Marble Hill have organised a series of nine free virtual talks over three weeks beginning on Wednesday 27th January.  Experts will explore, explain and offer insight about a luminary and their landscape, property
    and land.

    Alexander Pope was the principal literary genius of his day and was a pioneer in the landscape movement. His influence was critical, advocating ‘the simplicity of the ancients’ encapsulated in his poetic line to: ‘Consult the Genius of the Place in all,’ he was fundamental in establishing the new national style that came to be known as ‘English Garden Style’ which we will explore through his own garden at Twickenham and other gardens he influenced.

    This talk will be given by Dr Marion Harney, is Director of Studies and Director of Teaching at the University of Bath specialising in the history and theory of historic buildings, designed and cultural landscapes and their conservation. She is Visiting Professor, University of Westminster and External Examiner for the MA in Garden and Landscape History, Institute for Historical Research. More about the talk and the speaker can be found here.

    Admission to this talk is free but but we encourage you to make a £5 donation for each talk, if you are able, which will be divided equally between the nine participating organisations. More about the talk and the speaker can be found here and you can book your place at TicketSource.

    The talk will start at 7 pm and last for approximately 20 minutes with time being allowed for questions and answers at the end. The event will end at or before 8 pm. It will be delivered using Zoom so you will need a computer or tablet with the Zoom program/app on it. You will be sent a link by email shortly before the lecture begins and you should follow this link at the appropriate time to join the audience. If you haven't used Zoom before, you will be prompted to download the appropriate software as soon as you try to join. 

    This event is supported by the National Lottery Heritage Fund.

    ('A Plan of Mr Pope's Garden', John Serle, 1745)

    Pope's Grotto Preservation Trust event

  • 29 January 2021Visual Arts/Film

    This Week’s Recommendation: Mother

    Mother

    South Korea, 2009

    128 mins, language South Korean

    Directed by Joon-ho Bong

    Mother -  an earlier work from last year’s Oscar winning Parasite director, Joon-ho Bong - was the 688th film screened by RFS on 21st February 2012. It was the fourth equal ranked film of Season 49, with an approval rating of 86% from those attending.

    This strange, fascinating film begins with what seems like a straightforward premise. A young man of very limited intelligence is accused of murder. A clue with his name on it and eyewitness testimony tie him to the crime. His mother, a dynamo, plunges into action to prove her son innocent. So there we have it; he's either guilty or not and his mother will get to the bottom of things. Or not.

    She marches tirelessly around the village, doing her own detective work. She questions people, badgers them, harasses police, comforts her son and hires a worthless lawyer. We learn everything she learns. It seems she's getting nowhere but the film is labyrinthine and deceptive and not in a way we anticipate.

    Full film notes available in the Twickenham & Richmond Tribune - http://twickenhamtribune.com

    Mother can be streamed from Amazon Prime and the discs are available from Amazon and other retailers.

     

     

    Richmond Film Society event

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What's on

Today

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This month

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Where

Arts Richmond Events

EGM and AGM

Wednesday 2 December 2020, 19:30
Online via Zoom

Agendas, minutes, etc >


Young Writers Festival Competition

Young Writers Festival Competition

more details >

The Roger McGough Annual Poetry Prize 2020

Roger McGough

more details >