What's On

List of forthcoming events for The Arts Society Richmond:

Talk on 150 years of London Underground Design

Duke Street Church

06 October 2020 -
20:00

£5 payable on the door. No ticket needed.  Drinks from 7pm, one-hour lecture at 8pm.

Lecture outline
This lecture overs surprising attempts to create some graphic unity, even in the 1860s and 70s. Our speaker, Mark Ovenden, discusses the expansion of the London Underground and the need to create some cohesion between the different operating companies, Leslie Green’s architecture. He covers many subjects, including the Arts & Crafts movement, Frank Pick, Edward Johnston’s typeface, Charles Holden’s architecture and the Streamline Moderne/Art Deco movement, the New Works Programme, post war austerity and design, the Victoria Line, the loss of Johnston and its rescue by Kono, the Jubilee Line Extension and its architecture, the creation of TfL, recent schemes and future works including the Elizabeth Line/Northern Line extension to Battersea.

Profile
Mark is a broadcaster and author who specialises in the subjects of graphic design, cartography and architecture in public transport, with an emphasis on underground rapid transit.

His first book Metro Maps of the World published in 2003 is a guide to the diagrams, plans and maps of underground rapid transit system including images ranging from photos of the systems to rare and historical maps. Paris Metro Style in map and station design was published November 2008. Railway Maps of the World was published in May 2011 in the USA, a British edition was produced in September 2011. London Underground by Design was published by Penguin Books in January 2013. A celebration of the Johnston typeface centenary and 90th Anniversary of Gill Sans was published in 2016, and in July 2017 Mark fronted a television documentary for BBC Four on the subject of Johnston and Gill and in November 2018 he presented a documentary for BBC Radio 4 on skyscrapers.


From Tabards to Tailoring - Lecture

Duke Street Church

03 November 2020 -
20:00

£5 payable on the door. No ticket needed.  Drinks from 7pm, one-hour lecture at 8pm.

Lecture outline
By 2020 the global menswear industry is expected to be worth $33 billion. This illustrated lecture unpicks the social and political threads that hold the male wardrobe together by considering changing attitudes across the ages. It identifies key individuals from Beau Brummell to Edward VII and important periods of transition from the Restoration of Britain’s monarchy in 1660 to the ‘Youthquake’ that occurred after the Second World War. Following a timeline and explaining sartorial developments in conjunction with social and political changes, the lecture shows how men’s clothing, even thoughts on what it means to be male, has been in constant evolution. This remains so today.  

Speaker's Profile
Benjamin Wild is a cultural historian who writes and lectures about the history of dress. He convenes courses for the Victoria & Albert Museum and is a teacher of history at Sherborne School. He is half of the Dress:Fancy podcast (the other half being Lucy Clayton), a weekly show that discusses the prevalence, power and popularity of fancy dress costume. Previously, he was guest lecturer at the Condé Nast College of Fashion & Design and consultant lecturer at the Sotheby’s Institute of Art. He has written for a variety of magazines and academic journals and regularly talks at the National Portrait Gallery and the Royal Academy.

Benjamin read History at King’s College London. His doctorate, focusing on the material culture of the household of King Henry III of England, was published in 2012. His second book, A Life in Fashion: The Wardrobe of Cecil Beaton, was published in 2016. His next book is called Carnival to Catwalk: Global Reflections on Fancy Dress Costume


Talk on The Magic of Pantomime

Duke Street Church

01 December 2020 -
20:00

£5 payable on the door. No ticket needed.  Drinks from 7pm, one-hour lecture at 8pm. Free Christmas drinks and mince pies after the lecture

Lecture outline
The history of this enduring and peculiarly British institution, from its origins in 16th century Italian commedia dell’arte, through the influence of 19th century music hall, to the family shows that are still much loved today. On the way we examine the origins of some of the stories used in pantomime as well as such traditions as the (female) principal boy and the (male) pantomime dame. The talk is interspersed with personal anecdotes from the speaker’s years of working (and appearing) professionally in pantomime.

Speaker's Profile
Ian Gledhill has had a very varied career, from designing underground railways as an engineer for London Transport to appearing in pantomime with Julian Clary.  In between he has worked in travel and tourism, music publishing, television, and especially the theatre where he has been an actor, director, set designer, stage manager and opera translator. His main interests include architecture, history, transport and classical music, especially opera and operetta. He began giving lectures in 1997 and now gives on average around 140 a year. 


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Arts Richmond Events

Virtual Gallery

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The Roger McGough Annual Poetry Prize 2020

Roger McGough

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